Monthly Photo Challenge: The Changing Seasons: February

Old Man Winter had tired of toying with his usual victims. Feeling a bit of ennui after months of watching the hardy souls up north enduring his annual onslaught, he turned his beady little eye south of the Mason-Dixon line.

 

One hopes he has had quite enough frivolity for one year.

The morning after the big storm, I saw something I’d never seen before. How else to describe other than a sort of snow-fog? It was eerily beautiful.

 

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Snow fog over the southern fields

 

As February has drawn to a close, the snow is melting and a certain little Westie-boy is suffering from cabin fever. Aren’t we all?

And can we have a round of applause for the stalwart and cheerful crocus? Hope truly does spring eternal.

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Even after all these years of gardening, I am still amazed at what lies beneath….

 

Thank you to Cardinal Guzman for hosting this monthly photo challenge.

And thanks for reading,

Barbara

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About Silver in the Barn

Life in a 1915 farmhouse in Central Virginia. Blogging about whatever happens to catch my fancy - sometimes nonsense, occasionally not.
This entry was posted in Challenges, Garden, The Barn and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

122 Responses to Monthly Photo Challenge: The Changing Seasons: February

  1. Oh, don’t worry.Itwas (and still is) just as bad up in the north.

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  2. Carrie Rubin says:

    Yes, winter decided to spread the love this year, didn’t it? White stuff everywhere. But your pictures are gorgeous. Reminds us how pretty winter can be. It’s easy to forget when we’re in the thick of it.

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  3. Lovely pix! Enjoyed your take on the challenge! Like your various shots of the urn!

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  4. dorannrule says:

    You have a wonderful way of seeing things in total and adding poetic titles to complete a picture. Thank you! 🙂

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  5. Pingback: Monthly Photo Challenge: The Changing Seasons 03 | Cardinal Guzman

  6. It looks…springlike…um…spring-ish?? Gee just don’t want to jinx anything!!

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  7. Brrrr. I shivered as soon as I saw those photos come up. Thank goodness for the pic of Prada, virtually snowless, and the lovely crocus blooms. Always a favourite flower.

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    • Amazing how quickly that heavy snow melted, Kate. Isn’t Prada a doll? She trots right up to us when we’re doing our laps and demands attention in the form of apples or carrots. Such a diva.

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      • I’m such a sucker for horses, donkeys and mules. Can’t resist talking to them and stroking them. Prada looks lovely. I want a donkey/mule sanctuary!

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      • Berkley used to erupt in mad barking when they would approach the fence which didn’t exactly result in a calm communion with nature. Prada was an unexpected baby – her owner had no idea that a certain donkey who boarded for a few days at her barn had committed the dirty deed resulting in our little diva.

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  8. menomama3 says:

    There’s nothing like the optimism of the crocus. Thanks for that. We’re still covered in snow so thick it will be weeks before a crocus has any hope here.

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    • Crocus will always be one of my favorite flowers for exactly the reason you describe, Susanne. Such brave little hearts they have! You know they are just biding their time under that Canadian snow cover waiting for their time to strut on stage.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Gorgeous photos! Snow fog, heh, I love how you give it a poetic name — we just call it “reduced visibility” lol, but when you’re not driving, it really is lovely, and you’ve captured it so well! I love Westie boy’s collar — he’s a real gent, ain’t he? 🙂

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  10. Jodi says:

    Beautiful photos Barbara! Did you get a new camera? So happy to share the winter beauty with you 🙂

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  11. nrhatch says:

    Love the snow fog! Hope that spring greets you every step of the way today.

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  12. So many people seem to be in the midst of horrible weather. I’m not sure whether or not I should feel guilty. Here in the southern part of BC we are having the warmest, driest winter ever. Of course, we will pay dearly for it this summer. There is already talk of the forest fire danger increasing because things are so dry, and the much needed snowpack is nonexistent. Hopefully your brush with winter ends soon!

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    • We are having a brutal winter in the eastern part of the continent and,YES, you should feel very guilty. No, seriously, Kristie, I was hoping you all would get tons of snow in the west to help alleviate that terrible drought. Are you having drought conditions in BC too? My brother and sister live in Colorado and the threat of forest fires hangs heavily over their heads too.

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  13. KerryCan says:

    We may get worse winters but we are SO much better equipped to handle them that you poor folks are! I hope it’ll melt fast now. We live on the water so ice fog is a regular, beloved sight–amazing to see steam rising off water when you know the water temp can’t be more than 34 degrees!

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    • You really are better-equipped, Kerry. I remember when we first moved here marveling how two inches of snow could shut the schools down for three days. Northerners wouldn’t even blink an eye. Ooooh, ice fog. Sounds beautiful.

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  14. dogear6 says:

    I was kind of surprised at the second snow. The robins come back, it snows again and then spring comes. I will admit though that sometimes it snows twice after they come back and it did this year! It’s melting quickly here too, which is wonderful.

    My three brats are feeling housebound also. The streets in Short Pump were sufficiently cleared that I walked them around our subdivision and knocked them out a bit. Lots of dog snoring later in the afternoon!

    Nancy

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    • How funny! They are just like us and get out of shape after laying around the house in the cold weather. I’ve seen some robins and my feeders are just a mad house. Bluebirds were hanging around yesterday! All good signs.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. joannesisco says:

    Ohhhhh – you have flowers popping out already! …. and bare patches of grass …. *sigh* I remember those too, once upon a time …

    Snow fog is so beautiful. I wouldn’t want to drive in it, but it looks beautiful 🙂
    Loved your photos – it gives me hope!

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  16. I am soooo ready for spring, can’t believe you have already flowers blooming. We have only icicles and ice flowers 🙂

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  17. I just love your snowy photos, Barbara. That snog fog is gorgeous. Every winter, when we lived up north, I’d get sucker punched by every new snow fall. The white, crisp, sparkling snow … Wow! Then, of course, there was the 55-mile one-way commute to work, the bitter cold, the layering. Yeah! It might be cold now in Florida, but it’s far easier to bear.

    I don’t blame you for rooting for the crocus to take hold and for Spring to return. Give that little Westie boy a hug from me. 😉

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  18. vannillarock says:

    that winter mist/fog is such an atmospheric shot- shivering from the comfort of my warm room! first time i have come across this challenge- might have to pull something together 🙂

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  19. How lovely to see bare ground! Crocus are beautiful. Triumph over winter. Great pictures!

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    • It’s coming, Linda, slowly but surely. I know you have just been walloped repeatedly up there to the point of just being ridiculous. Can’t wait until you all see signs of life in your own gardens.

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  20. Parnassus says:

    Hello Barbara, Late winter snows in Ohio always just served to make me more eager for the maple season around the corner. I was always involved in making maple sugar (even posted once on it http://roadtoparnassus.blogspot.tw/2012/03/maple-sugar-season-nostalgic-look.html ). I suppose that was my early Spring activity, instead of gardening.

    Another good thing about winter in cold areas is that after the leaves drop, it is easier to photograph old buildings, or just to go around inspecting them. So if Spring is delayed, that makes a good chance to get out your camera and take some architectural photos.
    –Jim
    (P.S. Another way to deal with unpleasant winters is to move to Taiwan!)

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    • Hi Jim. What a terrific post that is. So reminded me of the process for extracting the sugar from the cane in Florida. It just goes to show me how New England-centric I am in my maple syrup thinking…never imagining it coming from Ohio. And isn’t it true that once you try real maple syrup, the very idea of Log Cabin syrup is just an abomination.

      You’re so right about the absence of leaf cover revealing treasures. And this is the time of year I also feel safe going into the really deep part of my woods without worrying about snakes, etc. I’ve found some wonderful natural objects to bring into the house just tromping through those woods.

      Enjoy that sunshine and warmth!

      Barbara

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  21. Sandra says:

    Beautiful photos. I so love wintry pics, especially when they’re not taken around my neck of the woods.😄😄

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  22. reocochran says:

    Barb, fhis was a lovely and fun tale of the winter’s search for warmth. Going south didn’t quite work out but it was a change of pace for you two (and winter, too). I liked the fog on the Southern fields and your pup. He is such a sweetheart, Barb! The photo of the crocuses popping out of the brown leaves and frozen ground really made an excellent point. You found the perfect words to express my thoughts on the matter. Hope springs eternal.

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    • I swear I could sink into a malaise were it not for the crocus reassuring me that spring is on its way! Hope all is well in your neck of the woods, Robin.

      Liked by 1 person

      • reocochran says:

        I wanted to tell you that your door really shows up in the ‘blandness’ of the white snow-laden house and yard. Now, I do love the way it all looks like powdered sugar frosting the scenery just right. It is not ‘bland’ in beauty just in its lack of color.
        Barb, since you asked about my neck of the woods. . .things were great and crazy over the weekend, I need a mini-vacation! The 4 year old Kyah’s party was fun at the new “Star Lanes” (by our Polaris shopping center) bowling alley, but they didn’t have a guard or entry way to the games room, each child got their wrist bands and little ‘debit’ cards for the time which money bought for them. But there wasn’t a bathroom by the game room, so Nana was in charge of escorting them past a huge bar and the VIP gatherings. Kyah had a “Frozen” movie inspired buttercream frosted cake. Pizza, cheese flatbreads and mini hot dogs were served in the party room.
        The second day of partying, Sunday, was a pool party. I was ‘forced’ to wear my suit and stand in the water up to my waist, since the Y has rules of every three children need to have not only the lifeguard on duty but an extra adult. My oldest daughter had made ‘minion’ cupcakes (and minion invites were made of felt and details all done so sweetly) and she asked Micah who turned 6, if he wanted lemon to match the yellow minions. He asked, “Could we try orange flavor instead?” So, the frosting with butter, vanilla and orange came out tasting like creamsicles. There were no take homes at all! Every child and adult had two cupcakes apiece, except my youngest who tried one bite of my first one! Sending you some warm hopes for real flowers and buds, along with warm sun upon your brow. I saw pussy willows on a bush by the library!

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  23. Heyjude says:

    Love the snow fog! Have you ever seen a fog bow? They are amazing!
    Crocuses seem thin on the ground this year – plenty of snowdrops and daffodils are starting to appear, but crocuses?

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  24. tildy1 says:

    Your photos are beautiful! I love the big oak covered in snow with your home in the background? Your westie is cute cute cute., great collection for the challenge. I’ll soon be posting mine too.

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    • Hello Tildy, I am enjoying listening to one of your Sunday songs as I write this. You do have a lovely blog. I am eager to see your country store evolve over the seasons. What a great choice for the challenge. My Max is wagging his tail at you!

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      • tildy1 says:

        Thank you so much for the compliment! It really is fun looking at all the seasonal posts. I hope the spring brings some vibrant colors! I’ll be looking for Max in your posts!

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  25. Here autumn is knocking on the door. I noticed potted daffodils are already on sale which makes me think that people long for spring more than enjoying what a nice autumn can bring.
    We are so lucky here in the Highlands where we do enjoy seasons unlike most of Australia.

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    • Hello Gerard. While I do yearn for spring, truthfully it is is usually fall’s arrival that fills me with relief. In a typical year, it is so bloody hot here for so long that by the time the cooler weather arrives, it is more than welcome. It’s hard to believe that I will ever be complaining about the heat again, but I’m sure it’s coming. Lovely that you can experience change of seasons in Australia. I am not familiar with the area you call the Highlands. Referring to Scotland, were they?

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  26. Grace says:

    Gorgeous photos, Barbara, I am amazed by the amount of snow you had! It will be a long time before I am able to see my crocus, we still have at least 3 feet on the ground. We are finally on a warming trend, however, and it gives me hope that spring isn’t far behind!

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  27. Good to see a snow fog again…from a safe distance.
    And how right you are about the crocus….you just know that spring is really on its way when they appear, ready to open up at the first sight of sunshine.

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    • And…apropos of nothing…I just had to look it up.
      The correct pluralization of Greek words ending in “us”, like Crocus, is Crocuses, not croci. If “crocus” was Latin, then it would be croci, but it’s not, it’s Greek in origin, which makes the plural crocuses.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Good morning, Helen. I had never before seen a snow fog and it was breathtaking. In the time it took me to find my phone and to race outside – in my pajamas – with Max on high alert because what on earth could I be up to – it had substantially dissipated. I’m happy the photo captured enough of it to translate a bit to you.

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      • A snow fog is something really special…..I’m glad (in a way) that you had the chance to see and photograph one even if it involved scandalising Max.
        And yes, isn’t the blogosphere wonderful!

        Liked by 1 person

  28. Stunning! Breathtaking! Gorgeous!

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  29. M-R says:

    I am continuously astounded by the beauty of your property, Barbara !

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  30. Lovely photography! Your flamingo-pink phone is doing a stunning job 😉 So nice to see flowers appearing. I was surprised by forsythia by the back gate just this morning!

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    • Good Sunday morning, Terry. You remind me to get out and harvest some forsythia for forcing. Lovely to know that things are happening in South Carolina. Surely we are on our way towards spring at last.

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  31. Eliza Waters says:

    Love your photos – the snow fog was the best! Ethereal. I think we’ve turned the corner and spring is in sight. Heave a huge sigh of relief! 🙂

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    • Eliza, I have to remember to get over to your blog and troll around a bit. You had posted photos in the fall of your garden and I remember there were flowers I wanted to try to grow here by seed. Dashed if I can remember what they were now. Isn’t it just the most miraculous thing to look out at all that snow and imagine what is waiting for you?? XXX

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      • Eliza Waters says:

        As I write, big fat flakes are falling. It is beautiful and I am surprisingly calm about the length of the winter. I know that yes, everything is lying in wait beneath the snow. As the Jamaicans say, “Soon come, mon.” 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  32. I had to put on a sweater just to read your post and still I’m debating between a hot cocoa or just move directly to the Tom & Jerrys and Hot Toddies.

    Beautiful, evocative scenes. (Waves to Max!)

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  33. bkpyett says:

    Such glorious photos and to see your little Max there with his little toy, waiting until the danger departs. The snow really is so wonderful as it kills the bugs. The crocus are magnificent, a forgotten miracle returns. Your ending makes me feel you are writing to me! Thank you, Barbara ❤

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    • Oh, what a nice thing to say, Barbara. The crocus are somewhat miraculous because they are in an area which we completely destroyed in the potting shed renovation. So to see that some bulbs survived and bloomed this spring is just the best!

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  34. What a cute doggy 🙂
    Shanghai didn’t see much in the likes of snow this winter. It is always fun here since it is so rare. It has been cold and damp though and gray for weeks on end. We are all looking forward to warmer sunny days.

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    • Yes, indeed. I think your Canadian countrymen would all enjoy a break from what has been a particularly harsh winter even by their standards.

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      • Yes they need the break. I am glad I have been here the last 2 winters. My dad said last winter was the worst…. but this year it topped it again. They had 37 days in the deep freeze! Normally we get 2-3 in a row. Those poor teachers with inside recess for over a month! Kids must be going squirely and driving teachers nuts!

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  35. And the snow-deprived Aussie goes gaga once again. Sigh. So beautiful. Yeah, okay and very cold. [shrugs]

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    • Good morning. Maybe you will see some snow in NYC? I’ve forgotten when you’ll be coming but with as much snow as they’ve received, I suspect snow piles might hang around into May!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hm. This is when I am in a bind. I would love, love, love it to snow while we are there but I also need to run and I’m not so sure about running in the stuff. Although, how cool would that be??? (See, you just can’t find a downside to snow when you don’t usually live with it.)

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  36. I’m envious that your crocuses have already bloomed. Maybe mine will join the party this week, hopefully with nary a gray hunk of snow in sight. Your pics really captured Old Man Winter’s latest visit.

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  37. desleyjane says:

    What beautiful photos!

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  38. Lovely wintry collage! Your snow fog is ethereal. Those little crocus are so sweet to see… makes me smile as I deal with a cranky over the time change this morning. I have never seen a mule in a turnout blankie, Prada and her pasture friend must be well loved! Is that a stuffie teddy Max is standing over? We have a string of 60 degree days coming, I hope the same for you! Good Sunday Morning Barbara!

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  39. Yep. Still beautiful. Can’t wait till this version of beauty leaves us, though. You’ve captured a winter wonderland !

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  40. Loved the snow fog – we had a few days like that and then others, where the wind whirled the snow high up in the air – dancing snow dervishes.
    And this week, it should all be melting away. No doubt, you’ll see more of those beautiful crocuses, the early spring messengers. I’ll be happy to just make it out of my driveway without fearing for my life 🙂

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  41. I really love these photos, and yes, let’s hear it for the crocus!

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    • Thank you so much, Hilary. I can imagine your lovely English garden being so far ahead of mine. But today was warm and sunny and things are starting to happen out there….I saw my first Lenten rose today!

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  42. You have a lot of snow! I really loved that oak tree.

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  43. Our snow up here in Minnesota is melting! Temps predicted in the 50s this week. It’s glorious. I am hanging my laundry out today for the first time since October. Current temp is 28 degrees, meaning my fingers got a bit chilled clipping wet clothed to the line. But…

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    • Have I shared with you how I yearn for a clothesline? I just don’t where to put it….you would understand my dilemma if you saw the layout of things here. I remember when my daughter was a baby and we didn’t have a clothes dryer, hanging those diapers on the line where they would freeze solid. Ahhh, the good old days!!

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    • And I forgot to say YAY!!!! for balmy fifty degree temps. Isn’t it just the best?

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  44. Zambian Lady says:

    I like the photos, especially the one of little doggy who is focused on ….. spring? The winter in Vienna has been very easy on us. I just hope it does not drag on as punishment, but we are looking forward to spring just like your little doggy.

    Liked by 1 person

  45. shoreacres says:

    The photos are beautiful. I always liked late snows. They tended to be a little wet, and often would cling to trees, fences and such in the most beautiful way. And I caught your comment about forcing forsythia. I do miss the more northern flowers and signs of spring. Pussy willows, and such. I was surprised to see a large stand of tulips in a nearby town this past weekend. I didn’t think it was cold enough here for them to do well.

    We just want to see the sun. It’s been gray and gloomy, and rainy, for days. I will NOT complain about water after the drought we had, but still: a little blue sky would be nice.

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  46. Behind the Story says:

    There’s no denying, the snowy pictures ARE beautiful. Love that picture of the oak tree with the house behind. Next week everything will look different.

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  47. reocochran says:

    Barb, I thought I would tell you of a fun book, I may not write a post about it. It is called, “World of Pies” by Karen Stolz. It was written in 2000 and it is a ‘coming of age’ book about someone who was born in 1950. She starts her book in a town in Texas. It is called Annette, Texas. It is 1962 and the mother stands up for a maid who makes a delicious pie, while the ‘boss’ or ‘mistress’ of the maid, wishes to enter her pie in the fair as her own. The story goes through the years quickly, less than 150 pages but quite a treat, Barb. It made me smile about her going to the pharmacy and sitting at the fountain having a chocolate milk shake. Other little memories got triggered. Not as worthwhile as the book, “The House Girl,” by Tara Conklin but a fun, easy read and walk down memory lane. Take care, Barb!

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    • Hello, Robin. I have “the House Girl” downloaded on my Kindle as a sample. Currently enguled in “Outlander.” I will check out “World of Pies” too. Just finished “The Invention of Wings” by Sue Monk Kidd who wrote the other very famous book entitled something about bees….memory completely escapes me at the moment….and I thought of you because it is interweaving stories of a slave mistress and her slave which reminded me a bit of your description of “House Girl.” I’ve been swamped lately and have not had a chance to properly respond to your comments on my blog or read your most recent posts. You know how it is! Spring is springing down here and I hope you’re seeing signs of life up your way too.

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  48. Lola Jane says:

    I agree with you that “even after all these years of gardening, I am still amazed at what lies beneath….” So true, and truly enjoyed the photos you posted, and love your little dog (though he probably has a huge personality). 🙂

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