Snail Mail Silver

Five Photos, Five Stories #3

Challenge Rules: I am to post a photo each day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo. It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem, or a short paragraph.

When you have a friend who deals in antique silver and a first name that’s become somewhat vintage, nice surprises might just arrive in the mail.

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My first name is as dated as a poodle skirt along with many others that were so popular in the 1950s and ’60s.  Is your first name one that immediately plops you down into the decade of your birth or is it more timeless? Would you ever expect to see it engraved on a piece of old silver?

I’m supposed to invite another blogger to join in on this challenge. If you want to, please do. 

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About Silver in the Barn

Life in a 1915 farmhouse in Central Virginia. Blogging about whatever happens to catch my fancy - sometimes nonsense, occasionally not.
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163 Responses to Snail Mail Silver

  1. shoreacres says:

    A fun fact: when my parents named me Linda, in 1946, they did so because they wanted a really unusual name, that no one ever had heard, and that would help make my name memorable. So much for that!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Bahaha! I did the same thing with Jennifer in 1974. I’d never encountered the name except for the actress Jennifer Jones and thought it such a lovely and unusual name. My poor Jen was always one of at least three in her classes. Linda, Barbara, Carol, Patricia, we’re all heading into extinction!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Linda, pop on over to my comments when you have a chance and read my friend Linda’s comment. She’s included a hilarious video. You may not have met Linda Richman yet.

      Like

  2. vannillarock says:

    you are so right. Anne absolutely dates me. in all my years of teaching i only ever taught one Anne. sometimes though if it is really old it will come round again. i named one of my daughters alice in 1986 and now i find there are lots of them.
    the spoon is such a lovely momento

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I seldom find my name anywhere. When I was in middle school, my fairy godmother (I call her) ordered something like 150 pencils with my name on them. I loved them so. I was so special then.
    The silver is beautiful, of course, and it’s lovely your friend thought of you.
    I’m quite fond of your name. I only know wonderful Barbaras.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Oh, that is so wonderful, Joey, that you got special pencils with your name. I’m assuming it was “Jolene” that was engraved? The Dolly Parton song, of course, springs to mind when I think of your full name. Knowing that your mother’s family comes from the mountains of western VA, I am not surprised that you carry a name with those sorts of roots. And thank you for the “Barbara” comment. I’ve often said the same thing about “Dorothy.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jolene Michael Packard — there was no way to deny they were mine! AHAHAHA!

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      • Yours is a name just destined to be emblazoned on the spines of numerous best sellers. “Have you heard? The latest ‘Jolene Michael Packard’ has just been released!” Are you old enough to remember “The Waltons?” The mother in that series was played by an actress with the first name Michael.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Haha, I cannot imagine!
        I am old enough 🙂 I was supposed to be Michael, but my father’s mother had a fit and I guess she won.
        Joey fits right, tho!

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  4. nrhatch says:

    My mom’s name is Barbara. She would enjoy having that spoon for her afternoon bowl of ice cream.

    Just saying . . . 😉

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  5. My name is positively Victorian! I might indeed find it engraved on a spoon! Love that idea!

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  6. ritaroberts says:

    Well Barbara, I too like the name my mother gave me because when I grew up I liked to think I was named after Rita Hayworth because that was one of my moms favourite film stars. (Wishful thinking I suppose.) Then came the song Rio Rita. Do you know that song? Not many of my name then but here in Crete there are four Rita’s in our village alone. Love the idea of your silver spoon.

    Like

  7. Barbara Stevens says:

    BS2 here…Still trying to not break the tenth commandment concerning that spoon.
    I jest, if anyone deserves the thoughtful gesture of friendship from Beth (or anyone else) it’s you.

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    • Hello, BS2. I just read your very informative “Barbara” email about our name and tried to post the cute little graph. WordPress won’t let me do it. Dash it to bits!! At least no one calls us Barbie, right? And to your point about “Barb”, that’s what all my friends and family call me which is fine, I guess. It’s how it’s always been, but is not my preference. Middle sister Sue decided in mid-life that she didn’t like it anymore and started going by her much more beautiful full name, Suzanne. Can’t say I blame her a bit.

      Like

  8. Like shoreacres, my parents also thought Linda would be a unique name. Along came Mike Myers as Coffee Talk’s “Linda Richman”. He based the character on his mother in law. Was a child born and named Linda after his 1991 segment with Barbra Streisand? I don’t think so.

    https://screen.yahoo.com/mike-myers-snl-skits/coffee-talk-barbara-streisand-stops-000000406.html

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    • HAHAHHAHAHAHAHHA!!! I am dying laughing! I am verklempt! OMG, this just killed me, Linda. I haven’t seen this in ages. The nails. The hair. The accents. I’m so glad they didn’t the character Bawbra! And didn’t he base this character on his own M-I-L? Thank you, thank you, thank you for my morning cackle.

      Like

      • Duh, Linda, I see you mentioned the M-I-L connection. I was in such a hurry to get to the video I missed that. I’m still dying over the nails.

        Liked by 1 person

      • shoreacres says:

        Now, this is pop culture I do know. All it took was the name Linda Richman to get me cackling. What’s especially funny is that my favorite aunt married in Iowa, divorced, then re-married a man who was “in garbage” in Jersey. She moved to Manhattan and started hanging out at the shore. By the time I knew her, she sounded like any Jersey girl. All of that was the least her her history. So many stories, so little time!

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      • He was “in garbage” in New Jersey. Sounds rather Soprano-ish to me, Linda, just sayin’. I lived in Massachusetts for many years where anybody named Barbara had to deal with the Rs being removed from the pronunciation which they made up for by placing at the end of your name. Hey, Linder, wanna go for a pizzer?

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      • shoreacres says:

        Not everyone would get the garbage reference, but… we always wondered. I never thought I’d find occasion to share one of my favs from The Traveling Wilburys, but here it is.

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      • The Traveling Wilburys. YES! Dylan and Tom Petty are two huge favorites of mine. “I knew him before he became a Jersey Girl.” Downloading immediately, Linda, if I can find it on iTunes. Thank you!! I have the soundtrack for one of the seasons of The Sopranos. Here’s a decidedly less upbeat song from Springsteen set on the New Jersey Turnpike:

        Liked by 1 person

      • You are more than welcome! That’s one of my life goals, make someone laugh at least once a day. Doesn’t happen every day but it is a goal, not a rule.

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      • You made two of us laugh (at least) because LInda Shoreacres confessed to a cackle as well. So you could even take a day off if you want to!

        Liked by 1 person

  9. I love silver. I inherited the family silver, so to speak and look after it carefully.

    On names, my mother wanted to call me Kate, but it wasn’t a baptismal name (?) so Katherine it was. My father favoured Elspeth or Elvira. Luckily he lost out, although I could probably live with Elvira. Think it had to do with Elvira Madigan.

    But, I like my name. Classic. With an equally classic abbreviation. I’m mostly Kate though. I wouldn’t change it. Most of my family were Marys and Margarets. My grandmother was Elizabeth. We did old names 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  10. My mother’s middle name is Barbara so and I think she is a child of the 60s so….As for me, I think my name has got a bit more popular in recent generations.

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    • You’re the only Marissa I’ve ever known. It’s such a pretty name, I wonder why it’s only recently that it’s become more popular. Did you know many others? What were the popular names when you were in school?

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      • Jennifer and Michael were THE most popular names of the 80s for sure!! I’ve known a couple or other Marisa’s (notice spelling of one ‘S’), and some of those pronounce their names mar-EE-sa. Does that count?

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      • Jennifer is my daughter’s name and I remember after I named her seeing something in the paper that the two most popular names that year were Jennifer and Jason (1974). Sorry, Jen. In high school she went by Jenna Marie for a while just to be a bit different. And both sides of my family have a Michael, you’re right.

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  11. I was named for
    A…my mother
    and
    B my aunt.

    I like neither name but use the latter.

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    • Did you know my middle name is Helen? Why would you, I suppose. I didn’t like it as a kid but it was my American grandmother’s name and I so adored her that I didn’t work up too much of an intense dislike for it. Now I like it very much. Are you going to keep secret the “A” name? C’mon, ‘fess up!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Jodi says:

    Love this! I love vintage silverware and I love vintage names. I used to think my Grandma’s name – Stella – was silly – now I adore it- and I think these old vintage names are becoming popular again. I have been wanting to get some fun stamped or engraved vintage silverware for my food blog photos. You’ve made we want it more! 🙂

    Like

    • Stella which has such connotations to “Streetcar Named Desire”, doesn’t it? Stanley Kowalski belting out the name….but it is a very pretty name which I think means star-like. You’re right, though, Jodi, it is one of those names with associations to the past. What about your name? Is Jodi your actual name or an abbreviation?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jodi says:

        Yep – the whole formal birth-given name – kinda boring – sorry it couldn’t be more exciting 🙂 Sometimes I make something up when people ask – – like Jodith (like Judith) ….

        Like

      • Speaking of names, I like Jake and Nick. Manly names for those two hunky men of yours. I have a nephew named Hank. His real name. My brother named him after our grandfather Henry who was always called Hank. Hey, Jodi, if you were a Southern girl, you’d be Jodi Ann or Sue. How they love the two name concept down here.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jodi says:

        Jodi Sue – LOL! Jake is really Jacob and Nick is really Nicholas – but we never call them that… should have just named them that – eh?

        Like

      • My VA friend sometimes calls me Barbara Sue. She can’t help herself. They want two names. I know an Ann Randolph, Mary Carter, Dorothy Jane, May Belle, and the beat goes on. Nicholas and Jacob are two timeless names – yah, I assumed those were their “nick”names.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. joannesisco says:

    What a lovely surprise to receive! I sincerely doubt my name has been engraved anywhere!

    I know what you mean about a name signifying a generation or a decade but I have no idea when – or if – Joanne was ever a popular name. I have rarely encountered other Joannes in my life and it’s always a bit of surprise when I do. Having said that, I’ve always hated my name. UGH.

    Like

    • Your name is a variation of Joan, I think. I knew a few Joannes growing up, maybe it was more popular in the States. Did you know Johnny Carson was married to a Joanne and a Joanna? And a Jody? EGAD. He had to have gotten in trouble using the wrong name at the wrong moment. Is it always Joanne or does your family have some sort of abbreviation? I know in my family, I’d be called Jo in two seconds. Everybody gets their name bisected, it seems.

      Like

      • joannesisco says:

        Strangely – no, my name isn’t often shortened. I would have loved to have had some kind of nickname. Joanne just sounds so harsh.

        Like

      • I always felt that way about my name too. BARB. Even the definition is not nice. I’ve never thought of Joanne as anything but a lovely name actually and even more so now. So there!

        Like

      • joannesisco says:

        It took me a few seconds to get it. I’ve never made that connection before, but I could see why you wouldn’t be very thrilled.

        Ironically, I’ve known several Barbs and none would be anywhere close to being a BARB ❤

        Liked by 1 person

  14. sweetsound says:

    My mother’s name us Barbara, and her mother, Alice Norelle. I’m Cali (and I’ve never found it on any sort of eating utensil or souvenir keychain sadly, but would love it if I did!) But I agree with Joni, I think vintage names are coming back in style!

    Like

    • Alice Norelle. That is very unusual. Was she a Southern lady by chance? So many very unusual first names seem to evolve from the South. I have a friend with a sister named Arnette. No, I don’t think you’ll find a Cali (at least not spelled that way) on any vintage silver. You might just have to create your own!

      Like

  15. I have a very 50s name: Susan, after Susan Hayward, my father’s favorite actress. There were 7 of us in my second grade class, including the teacher. I hated it when I was a child but I’m quite fond of it now that I’m into all things retro.

    Vintage names are definitely making a comeback. A coworker just had a baby and named her Greta, which I think is lovely.

    Like

    • I remember the lovely Susan Hayward. My middle sister is a Suzanne and was always called Sue. I’m assuming you were Susan, not Sue, in childhood. Seven Susans? Good lord. i wonder if Greta is a nod to a Nordic bloodline. I can’t see that name without thinking of Garbo, can you?

      Like

      • Yes, always Susan, never Sue. Greta’s parents are Italian (mom) and German (dad). So no Nordic that I’m aware of. Maybe some distant ancestor. I was thinking Greta Van Susteren was the only Greta I’d ever heard of. But I forgot the most famous Greta of them all — Garbo.

        Like

      • She’s fading out of the collective memory, Susan, Garbo that is. An Italian and German marriage might bring forth some creative names. Ute Sophia? Olivia Ingrid? Sorry, getting carried away here.

        Like

  16. suzicate says:

    That is awesome! I’d love to have a piece of silver engraved with my name!

    Like

  17. I hated my name of Kathryn, though I was named for my great grandmother Kate. It became my mother’s name as well an so on to my granddaughter. As a Navy brat I went to many schools and changed my name each year till I was caught up. The only people who call me Kathryn today are the medical profession. I wanted to call our first daughter Prudence after the Little Prudy books until my husband vetoed it. She is very happy he did.

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  18. markbialczak says:

    I don’t think little baby boys are being named Mark much anymore, Barbara.

    And I also can’t see Springsteen videos and mentions of the Jersey Turnpike and not add this favorite of mine to the mix.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Much to our delight and surprise we were sent an ornate silver spoon at the birth of our first grandson by the Dutch Embassy; It has a lovely sculpted stork carrying a baby in its beak at the top of the handle and his name and date of birth. ( Jak 2-6-2000) on the spoon itself.
    What a great gift.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Can’t say much about the birth name, but at the age of 8, we got to pick a Confirmation name. I chose Agnes. Seriously.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Agnes is an old name in my husband’s deeply Irish family. HIs grandmother, Sarah Agnes, went by Aggie. I can’t hear the name Agnes without picturing a nun for some reason. Names have such associations, don’t they? Thanks, Van. And there must be a story to Van.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I never admitted to Agnes, but it was on my college ID card as my middle name. Friends saw it. I was for 4 years known as “Aggie”. I liked it. ☺ My family has Irish roots as well, but I picked it because it was the feast day of St. Agnes when I got confirmed. I was seriously on my way to the convent. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Heyjude says:

    Your posts (and subsequent comments) are wonderful but I need to set aside a lot of time to read them, or get here quicker! My first name is Judith which is a very biblical name and odd given my family weren’t in the least religious. The story goes that it was supposed to be Julie, but dad forgot at the register office and wrote Judith instead. There was one other girl in my class called Judith which was lucky because when I fell asleep in history and woke with a start on hearing my name being called, it was usually directed at the other one. Middle name Margaret dates me as a lot of girls my age were named after the royal family. Elizabeth or Margaret. You don’t hear Margaret often now either. And never call me Judy. As a small child the lady in the house behind ours had a dog called Judy, so whenever anyone uses the name I think of a dog.
    😀

    Like

    • Hey Judith, these are great stories. I have heard the name Margaret more frequently here in the South than I ever did up north. Possibly it’s just as commonly given there but reduced to Peggy or Meg. Southern ladies tend to call themselves by their actual names. Margaret. Dorothy. Catherine with none of the nicknaming I see elsewhere. Do you ever wonder if your personality is affected by name? Would you be a bit different as a Julie than a Judith?

      Like

      • Heyjude says:

        I named my first doll Julie! Still have her though she is a little worse for wear (a china doll so a few cracks). And I now have a daughter-in-law called Julia. I actually like the name Julia, not so much Julie. Don’t know why.I think Judith is a much stronger name and my mother ALWAYS used our full names and hated anyone who used a nickname. So we were Geoffrey (not Geoff), Michael, (heaven forbid anyone called him Mike or even worse Mick) and Judith. The Jude started long before the Beatles song mainly because I refused to be called Judy. It’s a fascinating subject.

        Like

      • It’s so funny you would mention the Hey Jude song. Just a half hour ago I was reading a short little article in the Wall St. Journal where an author describes his ecstatic (yes, he used that word!) reaction to hearing the song for the first time. Who doesn’t love that song? Whoever it might be, I don’t want to meet him. Shall we add it to this musical comment thread? In your honor? I think so. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5c-LVYnafg

        Liked by 1 person

  22. Kate (@thefigintherose) says:

    As KathArine (the revered antique gilt-edged book in our house was Shakespeare, not a bible) I’m lucky if anyone can spell it right the first time – let alone find anything with it engraved correctly!! And dated perhaps, but I infinitely prefer Barbara to the Mabels I see coming back in fashion… Not to mention all those 90’s misspelled amalgamations that already look hidjus awful! xx Kate (fig)

    Like

    • Mabel is coming back in style? Good lord. That was one of my grandmother’s seemingly infinite supply of sister’s name. Her mother was Myrtle. Even though we’ve never met, dear Kate, I imagine you and the other famous Katharine (Hepburn) as having much in common. Both fabulous free spirits.

      Like

  23. Lovely spoon, lovely friend; enjoy your ice cream 😉 If you weren’t born with it in your mouth, you’ve at least earned it since! ❤ WG

    Like

    • Oh, definitely not born with it in my mouth, WG! It was a lovely surprise, you of the always classic, always beautiful name. Surely you must have been pleased with yours all through your life.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Actually, Barbara, I’ve had to fight for my name. My parents shortened it at birth to the one syllable nickname I’ve always hated. When I went off to college, I re-introduced myself to my new friends, and asked my family to also call me Elizabeth. Some did right away, others can’t trouble themselves with the 3 extra syllables. S firmly believes one should be called what one wishes to be called. It is a matter of respect. He is always annoyed with those aunts and uncles who use the childhood moniker 😉 And truthfully, so I am. My name comes from both of my grandmothers. My mother’s mother was “Ruth Elizabeth.” And beloved daughter has Elizabeth as her middle name, which she has passed on as her daughter’s middle name. I enjoy names which run in families 😉

        Like

      • And your name is one that has an abundance of nicknames – maybe more than any other: Beth, Liz, Betty, Betsy, Eliza….any others? Lizbeth? I don’t like “Barb” particularly but I’m so used to it from family and friends that my full name sounds funny coming out of their mouth. In any event, yours is a timeless, classic name which is never going to be dated. I hope.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you, Barbara. I’ve always been pleased to have it. Interestingly, my sister managed to grow up with her full name intact. No one seemed to mind all three syllables, except her cousins who shortened it, or called her “Barbie doll” which is so endearing. Did you ever get that one?

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      • Never, thank goodness. Barb it was, Barb it shall ever be, it seems.

        Liked by 1 person

  24. bkpyett says:

    What a delightful surprise! It has taken me a life time to appreciate my name, having always thought it meant stranger, or foreigner. Then in later years I learnt that it meant bringer of joy, and that’s just what you do, Barbara!! From one to another. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, my dear Barbara, I’ve never heard bringer of joy associated with our barbaric name but I’ll take it. From one to another, I say it takes one to know one (joy-giver, that is!) and thank you!

      Like

  25. KerryCan says:

    What a great spoon! And a good friend to send it to you. I would never expect to see my full name, Kerran, anywhere since my mother made it up. The story goes that she wanted to call me Kerry but didn’t think that was a “real” name so she came up with Kerran. But, 10 months and 3 weeks later, when she had my sister, she named her Kathy. Not Kathleen or Katherine, just Kathy. Go figure.

    Like

    • I like the name Kerran very much. Is it pronounced Karen? I used to know a Kieran years ago – an Irishman – are your roots Irish, by chance? Isn’t it funny that your mother would go to such lengths to give you a “real” name and then bestow a nickname on Kathy.

      Like

      • KerryCan says:

        It is pronounced Kerran and my Irish roots are far outweighed by British and Dutch. Who knows what motivated my mother . . . 😉

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      • Outlier Babe says:

        I grinned a little at your question and Kerran’s answer, because the two (Karen and Kerran) are pronounced the same by many Americans, and thus your question may have sounded odd to Kerran and her answer odd to you. These words, although homophones when said casually, are more often pronounced by the same American speaker three different ways when said in a row:
        Barry, berry, bury
        Isn’t language interesting?

        Like

      • When I moved to Massachusetts from Iowa, that sound gave me fits. For instance, I was mocked in my first job by the boss who heard me say “embarrassed.” I pronounced it em-bear-assed. They said more em-baa-rassed. I can’t think of a better way to spell it, you probably can. My husband’s mother was Carole which was pronounced with that same flat vowel sound Caaah-roll. I would say it more Care-ol. Yes, language fascinates me. And you too, I see.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Outlier Babe says:

        I think your spelling gets at that drawn-out “a” just fine. : )

        When I moved from Chicago to downstate New York, everyone said that I said “cat” as “kyat”–almost “key-at”. I was frustrated and furious, for I knew I did not, although of course I did. That is what got me interested in language at the age of five. Then, too, my good friend Vicky’s dad was a famous professor of Linguistics at City College in NYC. I remember one day, Vicky and I made up a really terrible overly-contrived sentence we thought extremely clever which had every American dialect we could think of represented in it. I remember some of it: “Warshington is offal (I remember that was the voice of Utica, NY)–perhops I shall go ba-yack to my aportmint at tin-nahn-dey-fahv ….” I forget the rest.

        It was nice to have a fellow “intellectual” for a pal.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, that’s awesome, Babe!! How you two must have howled. Here’s one for you from Massachusetts. My brother-in-law got a job as an “ahmid cah gahd.” Armored car guard. Have you ever heard the weird construct they have in PA and parts of Ohio? “The room needs painted.” What? Not “to be painted” or “needs painting” but “needs painted.” The first time I heard this was while showing houses to an Ohio client and he said it so many times I was ready to clobber him. He needs clobbered!! But it wasn’t just him, I’ve heard it since from people from that part of the country. And why am I keeping you from your letters? Dash it, I am a thoughtless wretch!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Outlier Babe says:

        You’re not keeping me from anything. I still have miles of blogs to go before I letter.

        No, I’ve never heard that. The one which is more common that drives me mad is “Shut the lights.” Gak!

        Like

      • Here in VA, it is “cut the lights off.” Or “cut off the TV.” I’ve not heard “shut the lights.” Too much trouble to throw in that pesky “off”, eh?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Outlier Babe says:

        Those small words can be such a bother.

        Like

  26. A thoughtful, very nice gift to receive… a treasure. My MIL’s name is Barbra. She is 87, so her Mother beat Streisand to the spelling… 🙂

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  27. What a thoughtful friend to gift you with this personalized silver. Lovely. My name, Audrey, has made a semi comeback in recent years. Who would have thought? But then lots of “old” names are experiencing a resurgence in popularity. My new great niece was named Evelyn.

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    • Ah yes, Evelyn, I name I associate strongly with a lovely Southern lady of 85 years. Audrey is a name I’ve always liked too – one of my best friends in high school had that name although her nickname was the dreadful “Gaylord.” Too long of a story to tell.

      Like

  28. lbeth1950 says:

    Somehow been missing you. So glad to find this post.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. At least, people can remember a name like Barbara, Linda, or Patricia. How would you like to be named Kenitia or Lamitiana?

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  30. Angie Mc says:

    Here goes. My birth name is Anjanette, pronounced Anjanay. Yep, when roll was called at my sweet little Catholic school it sounded something like this: Mary Ann? Present. Therese Marie? Present. Margaret Mary? Present. Mary Margaret? Present. Anjanette? Here 😀

    But to more important matters…2 Springsteen videos in the comments?! Score!

    Like

    • Oh my goodness, that is hilarious. I so recognize, as a good Catholic girl myself, the array of double names. Anjanay? Quite lovely, Angie, really. And yes! I’m so happy you saw the musical selections that post generated. Isn’t it funny how some posts end up going down a completely different rabbit hole in the comments section? Thanks for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Angie Mc says:

        I *love* great comment threads! Funny, I have a term “rabbit trails” for when something meanders off in a delightful way 😀 And thanks for identifying with my little girl dilemma. Yes, I do like the name Anjanette, and even tried to give it a go at the college level (you know, the sophisticated me) but…ya, people just can’t wrap their mouths around it easily. I’m a practical gal, so Angie is works 😀

        Like

  31. reocochran says:

    I draw and then paint baby names. Recent ones were for Hazel, Ryne, Colin and Presley for a girl! My name can be fun most of the time. No complaints from my kids for Caroline Marie, James Matthew and Felicia Ann.
    I used to love Christopher and Elizabeth. I am kind of a traditional person when it comes for names and had 2 good friends named Barb in my life and now you. 🙂
    Who ‘gets’ my frantic energy and names me such a clever nickname. Hope you have a fabulous Memorial day weekend!

    Like

    • Your children’s names are just beautiful, Robin!!! Hazel is a real throw-backm, isn’t it? I think of that old cartoon of the maid, remember that one? Oooh, dating myself again! Happy Memorial Day weekend to you, my little bumblebee.

      Like

  32. Inkplume says:

    Another Linda chiming in…and to boot, my middle name is Anne. No question, those names are dated but I like them and I wouldn’t change them.

    Like

    • Well, hello Linda, nice to meet you. Did you see the Linda Richman video. I just imagine every Linda out there cringing when she came to prominence. You’re right, of course, Linda and Anne are two very good names. Thanks for reading!!

      Like

  33. I never knew any other Heathers growing up and then in my 20s I came across five of them all in one place. But they were all 10-15 years older than me.

    I’m glad my father didn’t get his way. I’d have been Valerie.

    Like

    • I’ve only known one Valerie and she is one of the most unforgettable characters I’ve ever met. Impossible to describe in such a small place but she’s one of those people who when she leaves the room, you go Phew! But in a very good way. Funny and outrageous and currently living in Key West if that gives you a clue. Honestly, I’m trying to remember if I’ve known a Heather other than you and I don’t think so. Strange….

      Liked by 1 person

      • I am SO NOT a Valerie. I’m not a Deirdre either (which was my father’s other option).

        It’s odd because I don’t tend to think of my name as all that unusual. There are even songs written about me. And yes, I do happen to live on a hill. And my favourite colour is purple. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  34. I found an old piece of silver with the name HI-HO! written on it. What could that mean? Could the owner have been in the mortgage business, perhaps? Maybe a loan arranger?

    Like

    • Outlier Babe says:

      I would have assumed instead that it was from a set of seven, gifted by a certain princess to her favorite dwarves.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Babe, if you don’t read and follow Tom already, you should. I think you’ll like him very much.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Outlier Babe says:

        I can’t even follow the follows I follows : (
        But I will take a peek, for you, Barbara.

        Like

      • I know. But he is really good. Recommended to me by Helen Devries, one of my favoritest writers ever (she would kill me if she saw that word!) and i couldn’t resist. I feel exactly the same now, Babe, I have to winnow my blog follows down to a more manageable number or just get real and believe that most bloggers understand we can’t all read everything all the time. Because we really can’t and shouldn’t hold each other to such a requirement. Unspoken or no.

        Like

      • Outlier Babe says:

        I’m struggling today–I have literally a half-dozen letters (legal-type) that MUST get written tonight, and surgery in the morning (very minor–a correct to the minor surgery I had two months ago), and here I am, trying to catch up on blogs, d#mmit, and what should be a joyful, leisurely reading and sharing social experience is instead a frantic, irked pain-in-the-rear, and literal pain-in-the-body, for sitting at length is freaking awful for me. I can pace my place and read blogs on my phone or tablet, but then I can’t comment, and you know me.
        🙄

        Now, it sounds like I really should be reading Helen, too, doesn’t it. Gaw.

        Like

      • You really should. I simply ADORE her. She is highly opinionated (check), wicked smaht (check), loves dogs (check), and doesn’t suffer fools gladly (double-check.) and she doesn’t post so often that you can’t stand it.
        Good luck with surgery tomorrow and try to get a good night’s sleep. XXX

        Liked by 1 person

      • Outlier Babe says:

        Hah! re: that sleep. I am staying up until midnight so that I can eat up until the last minute!

        Like

      • HAHAHA! That’s the spirit!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Outlier Babe says:

        The spirit, and appetite, ARE willing, but the flesh has been passing out around 7PM for the past weeks, and awakening again around midnight. I’m going to set an alarm for 11:00 in case that happens tonight, to give me some stoking time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Outlier Babe says:

        Oh my gosh: I just tried my first Helen post and have only gotten so far as the plimsoll line on the turkey–I’m dying already. Envious, too, petty thing that I am. Darn you, Barbara! Another blog to follow?!

        Liked by 1 person

      • See? I told you. Read the one before that about the man saving her from DVT. And tell me you will not be motivated to “surge majestically’ forth into using all those pesky big words.

        Like

      • Outlier Babe says:

        I don’t KNOW all those pesky big words. My sister Meg uses them in everyday conversation, but I have been socially isolated for decades. Decades, Barbara. Until recently, I haven’t had intelligent conversation about other than technical issues since I was in my late twenties. And the vast majority of what I have now is via the keyboard.

        Like

    • I would reply to this but that darn Outlier Babe left the best possible response to this comment. She’s like that, you know…

      Like

  35. Outlier Babe says:

    This was so interesting. I was very surprised that engraved silver spoons stopped being given some time ago as baby gifts. When did THAT happen? All of the children in my family had them. Back when I was more flush, I sometimes gave them as gifts. My children received them–cups, and spoons.

    I wonder what happened to my name-engraved spoon? (I never saw it again after leaving for college.) Floating about some antique-store bin somewhere, or owned by someone else with my name.

    I was surprised at the names that have stopped being given, too. No more Barbaras, or Annettes? Really? No Annes?

    I sympathize with Elizabeth, and others whose names have many variations but who prefer only the full name. I have the opposite problem–a short name which can be a variation of a longer, but is not. Even after telling people, they feel free to lengthen it, by adding a diminutive suffix; e.g. If my full name were “Rose”, they’ll feel free to call me “Rosie”. Grrrr.

    Like

    • I know your name and assumed it was the dimunitive of you-know-what. And I was wrong! I knew a Monica once who grew homicidal at a co-workers insistence on calling her Mon. I mean really. Is it too much trouble to figure out what somebody wishes to be called and then comply. Signing off Babe-ishly: Grrrr.
      Oh, but if I find a something engraved in your name, won’t that be a thrill?

      Like

      • Outlier Babe says:

        I live in 700 square feet of space. If it’s the size of a spoon, it will be, as that’ s all I have room for. : )

        This stupid thing I have for pretending anonymity–I really ought to give up. It’s…something I need to think about.

        Like

  36. I thought my name was already extinct until “Friends” came out in the 1990s. Even then, I’ve only met a couple of Rachels in real life. Most others were only on TV.

    Liked by 1 person

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